Azure Websites leads to laziness

Its so easy to publish to Azure Websites that I became to lazy to flip the screen around.

In this blog post, I will be sharing a little trick with you. If you are a student and could use a few extra bucks, here is an easy way. Moreover, it will also make you lazy; I published my website to Azure Websites instead of flipping my laptop around.

The first step is to learn to do a Composite C1 site, I will be showing a post or two about that after the 4.0 release party, so for now visit www.composite.net and see if you can figure it out you self. There some great starter sites. 

Next, you will need to find a client, find someone who have not heard about this internet thing and tell them how great it really is. In my case I found my girlfriend, luckily she needed a homepage.

I used the beta, soon to be released, 4.0 Composite C1 CMS to create this page you see in the image above. For you people who do not know C1, what you see is the C1 Console. You have the tree structure on the left and the content area on the right. The tree in this case contains the Content, Media, ..., System Perspective. Under each of these perspectives, you can do a lot of nice stuff. (I did not even open Visual Studio to do this site). I will go in more details about those perspectives in a later post and only summarize what made this page come to live in a few hours.

  1. I wanted to use bootstrap. I added the stuff myself, but there are a great starter site with it enabled and some content showing how it works. I did not use this because I think it was easy to put in bootstrap then to delete the default content. I will create a starter site, in the process of learning how (Yes I am almost as new as it gets to C1 as you are if you have not started yet), with no content other than some twitter bootstrap layout pages in the coming weeks.
  2. I had to show six images of a product she made; I solved this by uploading them within the media perspective and added a packaged Composite.Media.ImageGallery.Slimbox2 to visualize these. I had to change it a little bit to fit in with my twitter bootstrap template, i wanted to put a <div class="row-fluid"> around the images. I simply just did this in the system perspective finding the package part that are used for rendered and injected my div.
  3. Adding a little info to the other pages. As you can see at http://naja-suikkanen.azurewebsites.net/ the site do not consist of much content right now.

You know those evenings where you just feel lazy? This was one of them; here is how Azure Websites helped me being lazy:

I said I did not even use Visual Studio, but I did use WebMatrix. In the image, you see how I created a Razor function to create the navigation menu. Then on the pages I needed this, I simply had to write:

@Html.C1().Function("S-Innovations.Navigation.TopLinks")

It being so easy to publish to AzureWebsites made me publish the site instead of just flipping the screen to my girlfriend and sending the link over Facebook. In addition, yes, creating websites with C1 is that easy, that you do not need an office, just a couch in the living room. 

Just to be consistence, when you press the publish button in WebMatrix you get throw the following screens. Select to create a new site.

Select a website name and press ok.

It will go throw a few steps of validating that it can upload the website before doing so, you can see those in my previously post on staging a site locally. Nevertheless, at the end, it is live and you can show your clients the site.

This is a free azure website, and if you are doing this for money, you need to solve the part about hosting with your client. Easiest solution is to make them host it them self on Azure and pay the bills. Question is now if I am going to be paid for this site :)



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